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Tips on How to Handle an IRS Letter or Notice | Business

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Tips on How to Handle an IRS Letter or Notice
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The IRS mails millions of letters every year to taxpayers for a variety of reasons. Keep the following suggestions in mind on how to best handle a letter or notice from the IRS:

  1. Do not panic. Simply responding will take care of most IRS letters and notices.
  2. Do not ignore the letter. Most IRS notices are about federal tax returns or tax accounts. Each notice deals with a specific issue and includes specific instructions on what to do. Read the letter carefully; some notices or letters require a response by a specific date.
  3. Respond timely. A notice may likely be about changes to a taxpayer’s account, taxes owed or a payment request. Sometimes a notice may ask for more information about a specific issue or item on a tax return. A timely response could minimize additional interest and penalty charges.
  4. If a notice indicates a changed or corrected tax return, review the information and compare it with your original return. If the taxpayer agrees, they should note the corrections on their copy of the tax return for their records. There is usually no need to reply to a notice unless specifically instructed to do so, or to make a payment.
  5. Taxpayers must respond to a notice they do not agree with. They should mail a letter explaining why they disagree to the address on the contact stub at the bottom of the notice. Include information and documents for the IRS to consider and allow at least 30 days for a response.
  6. There is no need to call the IRS or make an appointment at a taxpayer assistance center for most notices. If a call seems necessary, use the phone number in the upper right-hand corner of the notice. Be sure to have a copy of the related tax return and notice when calling.
  7. Always keep copies of any notices received with tax records.
  8.  The IRS and its authorized private collection agency will send letters and notices by mail. The IRS will not demand payment a certain way, such as prepaid debit or credit card. Taxpayers have several payment options for taxes owed.

For more on this topic, visit IRS.gov. Click on the link ‘Respond to a Notice’ at the bottom center of the home page. Also, see Publication 594, The IRS Collection Process.

This information is not intended to be a substitute for specific, individualized tax advice as individual situations will vary.  Royal Alliance Associates, Inc., Georgetown Capital and its advisors are not engaged in rendering tax advice.

These links are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only. We assume no liability for any inaccuracies, errors or omissions in or from any data or other information provided on the pages, or for any actions taken in reliance on any such data or information.

Prepared by the IRS.  For more information go to www.irs.gov.

Securities and investment advisory services may not be available in all states.

Representatives offer Securities and Advisory Services through Royal Alliance Associates, Inc., member FINRA/SIPC and a registered investment advisor.

Insurance services offered through Georgetown Capital Group, which is independent of Royal Alliance Associates, Inc. with separate ownership, and is not registered as a broker-dealer or investment advisor.

 Joseph V. Curatolo, President of Georgetown Capital Group

5350 Main Street, Williamsville, NY 14221

Phone #(716) 633-9800  Toll Free 1 (800) 648-8091  Fax #(716) 633-9789

www.georgetowncapital.com

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